Jun 14

spoliamag:

Surrealist photographer Kati Horna was born in Hungary and moved to Mexico, creating some of her most iconic work in Spain. 

When she’s written about, it’s mostly because she was the lover of Robert Capa, Very Important Photographer. And that is a shame, because her life and work are fascinating.

For the past twelve years I’ve joked about working two jobs, but now that I’m writing a book under contract I really actually am working two jobs. This means, now more than ever, that if I don’t see you very much it’s not because I don’t love you but because my workaholism has become crucial and involuntary rather than an (endearing? maddening?) eccentricity.

For the past twelve years I’ve joked about working two jobs, but now that I’m writing a book under contract I really actually am working two jobs. This means, now more than ever, that if I don’t see you very much it’s not because I don’t love you but because my workaholism has become crucial and involuntary rather than an (endearing? maddening?) eccentricity.

Jun 09
insolacion:

Fingerprint Man (1951) by Saul Steinberg

insolacion:

Fingerprint Man (1951) by Saul Steinberg

Source: insolacion

thebegats:

Last Thursday I appeared on Leonard Lopate’s show to discuss ancestry and my Harper’s piece, and he told me (both on and off the air) a little bit about his own family. Friday I was part of the very last night of luxlotus' Cafe Society, and Peter Von Ziegesar unsheathed this sword which had belonged to his ancestor and was sent to him by a stranger. Saturday morning I awoke to Nicole Rudick’s praise, and some of her own Texan family lore, at the Paris Review Daily. 
One of the best parts about the excitement of the last few weeks has been hearing other people’s juicy family stories, and now that I’m writing the book I have good reason to seek out even more. If you also have tales to tell, get in touch here, or email me at begatsy at gmail. I’m particularly interested in the ways we look for echoes down through the generations.
(Photo credit: Kirsten Major.)

thebegats:

Last Thursday I appeared on Leonard Lopate’s show to discuss ancestry and my Harper’s piece, and he told me (both on and off the air) a little bit about his own family. Friday I was part of the very last night of luxlotus' Cafe Society, and Peter Von Ziegesar unsheathed this sword which had belonged to his ancestor and was sent to him by a stranger. Saturday morning I awoke to Nicole Rudick’s praise, and some of her own Texan family lore, at the Paris Review Daily. 

One of the best parts about the excitement of the last few weeks has been hearing other people’s juicy family stories, and now that I’m writing the book I have good reason to seek out even more. If you also have tales to tell, get in touch here, or email me at begatsy at gmail. I’m particularly interested in the ways we look for echoes down through the generations.

(Photo credit: Kirsten Major.)

Jun 08
My parents’ theological arguments happened without fail every Sunday morning but otherwise might occur any hour of the night or day and always involved a lot of shouting and door-slamming and on occasion the tearing of Bibles.
One of the many times my mom refused to shut down her church, my father put my four-year-old sister and nine-year-old me on an evening flight to his parents’, through a connection in Atlanta, without telling my mother that he was sending us or where we had gone.
I didn’t remember scrawling this note when he wasn’t looking until she sent it to me last year. I imagine she must have been pretty panicked when she found it. 

My parents’ theological arguments happened without fail every Sunday morning but otherwise might occur any hour of the night or day and always involved a lot of shouting and door-slamming and on occasion the tearing of Bibles.

One of the many times my mom refused to shut down her church, my father put my four-year-old sister and nine-year-old me on an evening flight to his parents’, through a connection in Atlanta, without telling my mother that he was sending us or where we had gone.

I didn’t remember scrawling this note when he wasn’t looking until she sent it to me last year. I imagine she must have been pretty panicked when she found it. 

Jun 02
emilystjohnmandel:

Posted to Twitter just now by a London book blogger: a paragraph of things that I would not miss very much if civilization were to collapse tomorrow, although I’ve mostly enjoyed my time on the Internet and am certain that I’d retain some fond memories of it.

Every day I hope the broken Kensington post office will deliver Emily St. John Mandel’s book to me at last and every day I am disappointed. It’s really just as well because I’m still finishing up this work project. Soon, though, the project will be over and I will be much more focused on my own book, and I will finally be able to read Station Eleven, which, along with Laila Lalami’s The Moor’s Account, is something I’ve been looking forward to rewarding myself with for a long time now.

emilystjohnmandel:

Posted to Twitter just now by a London book blogger: a paragraph of things that I would not miss very much if civilization were to collapse tomorrow, although I’ve mostly enjoyed my time on the Internet and am certain that I’d retain some fond memories of it.

Every day I hope the broken Kensington post office will deliver Emily St. John Mandel’s book to me at last and every day I am disappointed. It’s really just as well because I’m still finishing up this work project. Soon, though, the project will be over and I will be much more focused on my own book, and I will finally be able to read Station Eleven, which, along with Laila Lalami’s The Moor’s Account, is something I’ve been looking forward to rewarding myself with for a long time now.

Compassion is not a relationship between the healer and the wounded. It’s a relationship between equals. Only when we know our own darkness well can we be present with the darkness of others. Compassion becomes real when we recognize our shared humanity.
Pema Chödrön (via emotional-algebra)
chelseahodson:

Inventory #518: Harper’s Vol. 328, No. 1969, June 2014
——-
REGARDING DETECTIVE WORK
My fear and my curiosity battled it out, and my curiosity won. It wasn’t much of a contest, honestly. 
—Maud Newton, “America’s Ancestry Craze”
——-
I’ll be appearing with Maud Newton and Peter von Ziegesar this Friday at India House for the season finale of Cafe Society. More information here. 

I am nearly speechless with delight! Can’t wait for Friday and to hear Chelsea read.
Join us if you’re free—I’m giving away 50 copies.

chelseahodson:

Inventory #518: Harper’s Vol. 328, No. 1969, June 2014

——-

REGARDING DETECTIVE WORK

My fear and my curiosity battled it out, and my curiosity won. It wasn’t much of a contest, honestly. 

—Maud Newton, “America’s Ancestry Craze”

——-

I’ll be appearing with Maud Newton and Peter von Ziegesar this Friday at India House for the season finale of Cafe Society. More information here

I am nearly speechless with delight! Can’t wait for Friday and to hear Chelsea read.

Join us if you’re free—I’m giving away 50 copies.

Jun 01
The alchemy between our genes and our individuality is a mystery we keep trying to solve.
A teeny excerpt from my Harper’s essay, which is on newsstands for the next couple weeks, if you were thinking of picking it up
May 31
gilliananderson1996:

The other day, I had this discussion with a friend where we attempted to identify the most truly definitive 90s pattern in the world. What we came up with (WHITE DAISIES) is deftly presented to you here by Ms. Anderson, looking pleased as punch.
I almost wish the Duchov wasn’t in the shot, smugly distracting us from this classic casual poly-blend button-up. But then again, his plaid shirt has a zipper in place of buttons so we may as well give him a free pass, forever.

Was desperately wishing the other day that I still had these daisy earrings I bought in 1992! 

gilliananderson1996:

The other day, I had this discussion with a friend where we attempted to identify the most truly definitive 90s pattern in the world. What we came up with (WHITE DAISIES) is deftly presented to you here by Ms. Anderson, looking pleased as punch.

I almost wish the Duchov wasn’t in the shot, smugly distracting us from this classic casual poly-blend button-up. But then again, his plaid shirt has a zipper in place of buttons so we may as well give him a free pass, forever.

Was desperately wishing the other day that I still had these daisy earrings I bought in 1992! 

May 28
Regram @andreabwalker! I didn’t know for sure that my editor also loved William Maxwell, but I had a feeling. And this bookplate in “Ancestors” from a collector who shares her last name seemed like a good omen. 🌿

Regram @andreabwalker! I didn’t know for sure that my editor also loved William Maxwell, but I had a feeling. And this bookplate in “Ancestors” from a collector who shares her last name seemed like a good omen. 🌿

May 27
I have never truly been in love with anyone who couldn’t write a beautiful letter. By beautiful, I mean spontaneous and true, surprising and passionate. I mean that every word feels as though it was written especially for me and that when I reach the end I read the whole thing again, two or three or five times more, without stopping. I mean that I want to bask in the language, or to bathe in it or eat it or have sex with it, or at the very least to put the envelope under my pillow so that if I wake up in the middle of the night thinking about it and I want to make sure my favorite part really is as deep or as intimate or delightful as I thought, I can read it again right away….
Last year I wrote a letter for therumpus' Letters in the Mail. I thought about it a lot while I was holed up writing over the past year, so I decided to post it on my site.
May 24

Three fragrances for people who love "old book smell"

emilygould:

"I don’t like reading ebooks because I just love the way old books smell." If I had a nickel for every time I heard this one, Emily Books would be a lot closer to its goal of eventually publishing all our editions in physical as well as ebook format! Alas, no nickels. But I do have some solutions…

Srsly. I like physical books, but I also read plenty of ebooks, particularly when I’m commuting or need old stuff that’s out-of-print, and ultimately, is reading primarily about the way the pages smell or about the words, the ideas, the stories? 

thebegats:

The Dallas Morning News (whose archives have corroborated family legends of shootings, killings, socialists, and so much more!) runs a partial transcript of my segment from the local NPR affiliate’s Think program about my Harper’s essay on ancestry.

I, too, find it really exciting — finally realizing how we’re all related to one another, finally recognizing that humankind is a brotherhood and sisterhood that can’t be denied.
But there’s a history in the world and even in this country of some pretty terrifying eugenics programs. There were mandatory sterilization laws for “mental defectives,” which was a pretty broad and nebulous category at the beginning of the last century. And, of course, we all know about the Holocaust, which is the ultimate symbol of what can go wrong when this kind of information becomes available and people can classify and categorize and come up with ideas that certain people are less valuable than others.

Here’s the whole hour of the segment, if you’re interested. I also discussed the piece on Wisconsin Public Radio last week.
(Photo of my essay from alexanderchee.)

thebegats:

The Dallas Morning News (whose archives have corroborated family legends of shootings, killings, socialists, and so much more!) runs a partial transcript of my segment from the local NPR affiliate’s Think program about my Harper’s essay on ancestry.

I, too, find it really exciting — finally realizing how we’re all related to one another, finally recognizing that humankind is a brotherhood and sisterhood that can’t be denied.

But there’s a history in the world and even in this country of some pretty terrifying eugenics programs. There were mandatory sterilization laws for “mental defectives,” which was a pretty broad and nebulous category at the beginning of the last century. And, of course, we all know about the Holocaust, which is the ultimate symbol of what can go wrong when this kind of information becomes available and people can classify and categorize and come up with ideas that certain people are less valuable than others.

Here’s the whole hour of the segment, if you’re interested. I also discussed the piece on Wisconsin Public Radio last week.

(Photo of my essay from alexanderchee.)

400facts:

by Stephen Maurice Graham
Print available on my store

Instanostalgia

Source: 400facts

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